University of Nebraska–Lincoln wins 2019 NCEES Engineering Education Award

Charles W. Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction takes $25,000 grand prize for interdisciplinary design project

NCEES is pleased to announce that the University of Nebraska–Lincoln is the grand prize winner of the 2019 NCEES Engineering Education Award. The university received the award for a project completed by the Charles W. Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction. The award jury met June 4, 2019, in Clemson, South Carolina, to select the $25,000 grand prize winner.

For the school’s project, Jack H. Miller Center for Musical Arts, architectural engineering students collaborated with professional engineers, architects, and other professionals to design the structural, mechanical, and electrical systems for the Jack H. Miller Center for Musical Arts on the Hope College campus in Holland, Michigan. The design offers superior acoustics, integrated timber or engineered wood throughout 25 percent of the building, and a rooftop amenity space that can be used year-round.

The jury praised the project for involving different engineering disciplines and a practical design solution.

The jury selected seven additional winners to receive awards of $10,000 each:

Additional winners

  • Lipscomb University
    
Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering
    Sustainable Water Treatment Prototype System for a Ghanaian Orphanage, School, and Hospital Campus
  • Seattle University
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Infrastructure Improvement of a County Road
  • Seattle University
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Seismic Assessment and Retrofit of a County Pump Station
  • Smith College
    Picker Engineering Program

    Development of a Culvert Evaluation Program
  • University of Cincinnati
    Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management
    Hoyes Field Elementary–A Net-Zero Energy School
  • University of Wisconsin–Madison

    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Alternative Energy Generation at School A
  • University of Wisconsin–Madison
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Design for Removal of VOCs at Drinking Water Well 18

The NCEES Engineering Education Award recognizes engineering programs that encourage collaboration between students and professional engineers. EAC/ABET-accredited programs from all engineering disciplines were invited to submit projects that integrate professional practice and education.

A jury of NCEES members and representatives from academic institutions and engineering societies selected the winners from the 51 entries. The jury members considered the following criteria:

  • Successful collaboration of faculty, students, and licensed professional engineers
  • Protection of health, safety, and/or welfare of the public
  • Multidiscipline and/or allied profession participation
  • Knowledge or skills gained
  • Effectiveness of display board, abstract, and project description

Profiles of the winning submissions are available online at ncees.org/award.

News release

Download the news release (PDF).


June 2019 Licensure Exchange

Read the latest issue of Licensure Exchange, the NCEES publication dedicated to opinions and ideas regarding the licensure of engineers and surveyors.

  • HQ Update: New headquarters will usher NCEES into a new century
  • From the President—Member board visitation program: A win-win for NCEES and boards
  • Committee Focus: Task force studies restructuring of PS exam
  • Enforcement Beat: Can your board regulate “engineers”? Maybe not.
  • Committee Focus: ACCA considers proxy voting for NCEES meetings
  • Engineering Change Lab takes unique approach to address future of engineering
  • Member board news, upcoming events, and NCEES outreach
  • NCEES annual meeting registration opens online

Download the June 2019 issue (PDF).

Browse the Licensure Exchange archives.


NCEES announces headquarters relocation to Greenville, S.C.

The National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying is relocating its headquarters to Greenville, South Carolina, from its current location in nearby Seneca. NCEES’ new headquarters will occupy 70,600 square feet at 200 Verdae Boulevard.

“The new headquarters will provide a better position for the growth of the organization and allow NCEES to better support its member boards and the professions of engineering and surveying,” explained NCEES Chief Executive Officer David Cox. “NCEES is entering its second century of advancing licensure for engineers and surveyors, and this move will help us better fulfill our mission to safeguard the health, safety, and welfare of the public.”

NCEES is a national nonprofit organization made up of the engineering and surveying licensing boards from across the United States and its territories. It provides a range of services to support licensure and public protection, including developing the exams used to license professional engineers and surveyors.

NCEES brings hundreds of professional engineers and surveyors from across the country each year to its headquarters to assist with exam development. Therefore, the move is expected to have an annual economic impact of $1 million for the Greenville tourism and hospitality industry, including local hotels, catering, restaurants, and transportation.

The relocation will be completed in the spring of 2020, which will coincide with the organization’s 100th anniversary.

News release

Download the news release (PDF).

For more information

Contact: David Cox
Chief Executive Officer
864.654.6824


April 2019 Licensure Exchange

Read the latest issue of Licensure Exchange, the NCEES publication dedicated to opinions and ideas regarding the licensure of engineers and surveyors.

  • Member Board Brief: Small changes may lead to big gains in initial licensure and license portability
  • DiscoverE outreach brings different ways to serve engineering and surveying professions
  • From the President: Working together to protect the public
  • NCEES and EWB-USA working to increase licensure through partnered campaign
  • Enforcement Beat: Don’t be afraid to dig deeper and ask tough questions
  • HQ Update: Upcoming meetings offer opportunities for exchange of ideas
  • NCEES preparing to select winners for 2019 Engineering and Surveying Education awards
  • Member board news and upcoming events
  • NCEES annual report and Squared now available

Download the April 2019 issue (PDF).

Browse the Licensure Exchange archives.


February 2019 Licensure Exchange

Read the latest issue of Licensure Exchange, the NCEES publication dedicated to opinions and ideas regarding the licensure of engineers and surveyors.

  • Member Board Brief: Focus on public protection key to addressing threats to licensure
  • From the President—NCEES and DiscoverE: Collaboration that’s working
  • NTSB report on gas explosion emphasizes role of engineering licensure in public protection
  • HQ Update: Engineers Week and Surveyors Week need your knowledge and enthusiasm
  • Exam News: NCEES seeks nuclear engineers’ professional expertise and advice
  • NCEES funding available for first-time attendees to annual meeting
  • Enforcement Beat: Let the Rules of Professional Conduct be your guide in ethical decisions
  • Zones prepare for 2019 interim meetings
  • Member board news and upcoming events
  • Save the date for 2019 NCEES annual meeting

Download the February 2019 issue (PDF).

Browse the Licensure Exchange archives.


NCEES seeks nuclear engineers’ professional expertise and advice

NCEES seeks nuclear engineers’ professional expertise and advice. NCEES is currently seeking licensed nuclear engineers to participate in a professional activities and knowledge study, or PAKS, for the PE Nuclear exam. The results of this online survey will be used to update specifications for the exam, which is used throughout the United States for licensing purposes.

NCEES requires a cross section of licensed professional engineers practicing nuclear engineering—including those working in industry, consulting, the public sector, and academia—to complete an online survey about the tasks and knowledge required of a licensed nuclear engineer with four to six years of experience to practice in a manner that safeguards the health, safety, and welfare of the public. The survey can be completed in approximately 40 minutes. These studies help NCEES ensure its licensing exams remain relevant to current professional practice.

The online survey will be open at bit.ly/PENuclear until April 10, 2019. For more information, contact NCEES Exam Development Engineer Don Colman, P.E., at dcolman@ncees.org or 864-654-6824.

Download the news release (PDF).


Update on October 2018 exam results

All results from the October 2018 pencil-and-paper PE exams have been released to NCEES member licensing boards. SE exam results were released on December 10. PE exam results were released on December 5. How and when examinees receive their results varies by state.

Some boards use NCEES Exam Administration Services to release the results directly to examinees. Some release them through another testing service such as PCS. Other boards release the results themselves. In addition, some state boards validate the results at a board meeting before they can release them to examinees.

To find out how you will receive your result, select your state (or foreign entity) and exam from the engineering webpage or log into your MyNCEES account.

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December 2018 Licensure Exchange

Read the latest issue of Licensure Exchange, the NCEES publication dedicated to opinions and ideas regarding the licensure of engineers and surveyors.

  • HQ Update: Right back where I started
  • From the President: Public outreach critical for promoting the value of licensure
  • Committee Focus: NCEES committees and task forces begin work on 2018–19 agenda
  • Judges for Future City regionals surveying award needed
  • Enforcement Beat: Board application processing can benefit from using Enforcement Exchange
  • Board approves 2019 calculator list for NCEES exams
  • Member board news and upcoming events
  • Remembering NCEES past president Henn Rebane
  • NCEES publishes 2018 Engineering Education Award Book, opens 2019 competition

Download the December 2018 issue (PDF).

Browse the Licensure Exchange archives.


NTSB report on gas explosion emphasizes role of engineering licensure in public protection

The release of the National Transportation Safety Board’s report, Natural Gas Distribution System Project Development and Review, highlights the important protections that licensed professional engineers (P.E.s) provide the U.S. public. In this report, NTSB issued several recommendations concerning professional engineering licensure requirements. With its focus on competency and ethics, licensure is an essential safeguard for the public, and the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) supports the NTSB recommendations as necessary steps for public protection.

The safety recommendation report was issued on November 14, 2018, in response to a series of explosions and fires on September 13, 2018, in Merrimack Valley, Massachusetts. These explosions and fires followed the release of high-pressure natural gas into a low-pressure gas distribution system. They resulted in damage to 131 structures, including the destruction of at least five homes. One individual was killed, and at least 28 others were injured.

Among other findings, the NTSB report concludes that the gas company would probably have identified the omission of regulator-sensing lines—thereby preventing the error that led to this accident—if the company had performed a comprehensive constructability review that required all departments to review the project plans and had a P.E. approve, or seal, the plans. In sealing such plans, a professional engineer takes responsibility for their accuracy and completeness. The report notes that the company field engineer was not a licensed P.E. and that neither state law nor company policy required a licensed P.E. to develop or review engineering plans for public utilities.

In relation to professional engineering licensure, the NTSB report specifically recommends that Massachusetts eliminate the P.E. license exemption for public utility work and require a P.E. seal on engineering drawings for public utility projects. It further recommends that the gas company revise its engineering plan review process to ensure that a P.E. seals plans before work begins. The NTSB recommendations concerning P.E. licensure requirements are changes that would protect the public, and NCEES hopes that all the proper steps are taken to ensure that these recommendations are addressed.

Massachusetts is not alone in allowing license exemptions for certain groups of engineers. Each U.S. state and territory sets its own licensing laws, and the majority have some type of exemption, including those for engineers working in industrial, manufacturing, public utility, and transportation settings. Some federal agencies also have P.E. license exemptions for federal engineering projects. NCEES encourages other U.S. states, as well as federal agencies, to review this report and consider its recommendations for their own jurisdictions to avoid similar tragedies.

Professional licensing has one purpose: public protection. P.E.s must meet education and experience requirements and pass the required exams to establish that they can practice engineering without endangering the public. To maintain a license, a P.E. must adhere to a strict code of conduct, with the primary charge being to practice the profession in a manner that protects the health, safety, and welfare of the public. A professional engineer who violates this obligation—either through incompetence or unethical actions—is subject to losing his or her license.

While we cannot go back and prevent what has already happened, we can work to ensure that proper steps are taken to prevent similar accidents. Public utilities is one of the many areas in which professional engineers can be called on to ensure that business activities adequately protect public welfare. As an organization committed to advancing licensure for engineers and surveyors, NCEES and its member licensing boards from all U.S. states and territories continue to focus on the fundamental goal of safeguarding the public. NCEES commends NTSB for taking this position to protect the U.S. public from incompetent or unethical practices.

James J. Purcell, P.E.
NCEES President

B. David Cox
NCEES Chief Executive Officer

Download the NCEES news release (PDF).
Read the NTSB safety recommendation report (PSR1802).

For more information

B. David Cox
NCEES Chief Executive Officer
dcox@ncees.org
864-654-6824


October 2018 Licensure Exchange

Read the latest issue of Licensure Exchange, the NCEES publication dedicated to opinions and ideas regarding the licensure of engineers and surveyors.

  • Delegates debate the issues at 97th NCEES annual meeting
  • Purcell accepts presidency, outlines vision for year ahead
  • Mentoring new MBAs is everyone’s responsibility
  • NCEES recognizes distinguished service
  • Nominations open for NCEES service awards
  • Exam News: PE Nuclear exam completes move to computer-based testing
  • Enforcement Beat: Being ethically responsible to the profession
  • HQ Update: Cox named CEO of NCEES
  • Upcoming events, member board news, and NCEES outreach
  • NCEES installs 2018–19 board of directors

Download the October 2018 issue (PDF).

Browse the Licensure Exchange archives.