Model Law designation

Model Law designations—MLE, MLSE, MLS—indicate to state licensing boards that your education, experience, and examinations meet the NCEES Model Law requirements. In many states, this will further expedite the comity licensure process.

Summary of Model Law requirements

The requirements to become an MLE, MLSE, or MLS are summarized below. For complete details, review NCEES Model Rules 210.20 Definitions and NCEES Model Law 130 Licensure.

Model Law Engineer (MLE)

  • Bachelor’s degree in engineering from an EAC/ABET-accredited program
  • Four years of acceptable engineering work experience
  • Pass the FE and PE exams
  • Clean disciplinary record

Model Law Surveyor (MLS)

  • Bachelor’s degree in surveying from an EAC/ETAC/ASAC/ABET-accredited program
  • Four years of acceptable surveying work experience
  • Pass the FS and PS exams
  • Clean disciplinary record

How do I obtain a Model Law designation?

When you apply for a Council Record, NCEES staff will review your file to determine if it meets the Model Law criteria. You do not have to request this. If you qualify, your Record will include the appropriate designation.

What are the Model Law and Model Rules?

The NCEES Model Law and Model Rules are governing documents that outline best practices for the licensure of professional engineers and surveyors. They guide state licensing boards as the boards develop laws and rules regulating these professions.

Structural engineers

The MLSE is an additional designation in the NCEES Records program and can be acquired through application in the existing Record holder account for qualifying individuals. The fee to apply is $50.

Model Law Structural Engineering (MLSE)

  • Bachelor’s degree in engineering from an EAC/ABET-accredited program
  • Pass a minimum of 18 semester hours of structural analysis and design courses, of which at least 9 are structural design courses.
  • Pass the FE exam and one of the following:
    • 16 hours of NCEES structural exams, 8 hours of which are the Structural II exam taken prior to January 1, 2011
    • 16-hour state-written structural exams taken prior to 2004
    • NCEES Structural II exam plus 8-hour state-written structural exams taken prior to January 1, 2011
    • NCEES 16-hour Structural Engineering exam taken after January 1, 2011
  • Four years of acceptable structural engineering work experience
  • Clean disciplinary record